Pandemic

Making something fun? Pics or it never happened.
Tapeworm
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Tapeworm » Sat Jul 21, 2018 4:26 pm

This army is going to be so epic! I just wish there would be some paint splashed around. :rasp:

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Dai
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Dai » Fri Jul 27, 2018 12:52 am

Man, you really do have a lot of cool stuff Stelio.

I had the Heavy Bolters Dread and definitely painted the arms, torso and legs separately. I also left off the banner as I just knew it would snap off at some point, plus it could then be useable for my fantasy Minotaur or Dragon Ogre.

Shame to read about the Knight legs. My own experience with 3D printed models is not much better. Still not impressed with all those ridges from the printing process. Think it’ll be a LONG time before I decide to go down that route again I think.
Arse! Feck! Drink! Girls!

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minamoto
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Re: Pandemic

Post by minamoto » Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:42 pm

This log is so full of awesomesauce :luv: :luv:
And that lovely Dreadnought of Nurgle :luv: I remember painting all thes pustulles :bum:

Looking forward to when you slab some paint on them.
>> Text goes 'ere <<

Stelio
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Stelio » Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:31 pm

Last Sunday I got a bit of time to myself, so I started work on the Rhino. Here are the Grim Skull components, ready to go:

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The resin used is different to any other that I've seen. It's smoother but also it seems tougher. Whereas Forge World resin, for example, seems somewhat brittle or fragile, this stuff feels more like conventional plastic. It's certainly still got a remarkable level of detail.

As to the components themselves, they are obviously cast from Games Workshop pieces with additional glorious detail added. And that left-hand door (right on the photo) with the leering skull faces? That's actually the (out of production) Forge World Death Guard Rhino door, again shamelessly cast. I'm not quite sure how this item is still available to buy. I'd have expected it to be shut down by corporate lawyers.

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One modelling quirk to note is that since the right-hand doorway is open to the inner blast doors, it's necessary to cut away those doors from the inner side section, as visible in the photo above. Actually that piece of door is useful; I'm going to try using it on a piece of terrain that I have in mind at a later date. (I might see if I can get a second door from another Rhino at some point.)

And here's the fully assembled vehicle:

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It's all glued together. There's no point making the interior accessible, as the inside decor in no way reflects the outside. I will be modelling an interior on one of my Rhinos, but not this one.

You can see that I've added some spare components from the Plague Drones to the front fender, which was looking very bare in comparison to the rest of the model. And at the back, where there were some flat blank panels, I've added some pits and scratches to tie in with the look and feel of the rest of the model.

And I've mounted the smoke launchers from the first Forge World Death Guard Dreadnought at the back of the Rhino, carefully removing a maggot to make way. It's perfect.

Still to do:
  • Put together a combi-bolter mount for the gun emplacement.
  • Fill in gaps between the edges of components, using the backing soda + superglue trick.

Stelio
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Stelio » Thu Aug 02, 2018 9:44 pm

On Painting

I want to paint my models. I really do. But I haven't done anything about it yet, beyond buying some paints.

One the one hand, my first priority has to be on completing the models ready for play. While I've got my 1000 points of Nurgle Daemons ready, Max also needs his 1000 points built. So that's my current focus.

There's also a new plan of playing some Kill Team as well as Warhammer 40,000 in September, so I also want to put together some Plague Marines and Poxwalkers for that.

And on the other hand, I have very little painting experience, so I admit that I'm putting it off. In particular, I'm worried about the spray undercoat: if I get it wrong I'll trash the (expensive and rare, possibly unreplaceable) models, and it can go wrong if it's too hot, too cold, too humid, or I just balls it up in some other way.

However... some of the models I'm building for Max (notably the Dreadnought and Knight) have to be partially painted before they are fully assembled. So in a sense the modelling work will force me to start painting.

tl;dr: Painting will happen... eventually.

Tapeworm
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Tapeworm » Mon Aug 06, 2018 3:03 pm

There’s some good airbrush primers out there. The one I have and have used in the past is the Vallejo surface primer. I have all of the colors and they all work well but when first sprayed the finish is very delicate and needs to cure for a couple of days. The one big difference between conventional spray primers and the Vallejo primers is you can’t sand or file the airbrush primer. There’s an old trick with spray primer where you paint alternating colors of primer when you are trying to get really smooth surfaces. It makes it much easier to find low spots that need to be filled. Airbrush primer is really nice because it’s less sensitive to temperature and humidity, you have much more control, and it can be sprayed inside a structure without the terrible smells of conventional primer. It can be a bit tricky when working with airbrush primer because when working on a converted model you’ll notice things like mold lines or gaps that were not as noticeable before priming. With conventional primer you can scrape, file, cut, and/or sand the problem areas. Vallejo surface primer is rubbery and has a tendency to peel off if you try to manipulate the surface too much. I’ve ruined several models with conventional spray primer because where I live it’s almost always very humid and I’ve had it ruin some really nice conversions with this weird alligator skin texture that is absolutely horrible and to remove the primer I had to use heavy enough stripper to eat all of the putty work. That’s why I switched to airbrush primer and have been pleased with the results other than the issues I mentioned earlier.

Stelio
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Stelio » Thu Aug 30, 2018 12:43 am

Yesterday I started work on the knight's legs. It's not a simple task, given that the poseable legs contain so many components. Here's a start for one of the feet, where I've glued the two parts of the toes together:

Image

This is for the left foot which will be flat on the ground, so I can set the angle very confidently. I used the toothpick to support the pieces as they dried in order to ensure the correct and consistent angle for all four.

The base itself looks like this:

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The left foot will be on the ground, and the right foot raised on top of the turret (which is now securely glued on). I still want to add a bit more filler around some of the gaps, but that's an easy job to do. The turret is from the WH40k heroic bases kit, by the way. I put together the rest of the bases from that kit as well; some I'll use for nurglings (in particular the pipe (without platform) and the barrel).

For a break and to get out something rather more quickly, I also started work on my Death Guard kill team:

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These two are from the easy to build Plague Marines kit. They are cleaned, assembled (with a little glue), barrels drilled, and pinned to the bases. Job done. Five more models to go to complete the team.

Stelio
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Stelio » Fri Aug 31, 2018 11:06 pm

More work on the knight's base last night. I did that final filling in around the turret. And I started putting together the feet. These are surprisingly fiddly to do, as they come in nine pieces: the foot, four toes, and the four pieces that connect them together.

The one that goes on the ground is straightforward as it's a level surface. But the centre of the foot for a knight is raised up, with the weight resting just on the toes. In order to put it together, I found that a British pound coin was exactly the right height and width to act as a spacer, and accordingly glued the bits together.

Here's a comparison of the 3D-printed-and-cast foot on the left, and the single-piece plastic GW foot on the right (don't worry about the difference in the upper surface; there are extra bits I haven't added to the plastic one):

Image

I'm not done with that foot though. On the underneath of the 3rd party piece there are ridges which, realistically, would sink into the ground. So I need to carve/file those off. The GW foot, in comparison, is empty underneath.

The ridges are fine to stay on the other foot, as that's going to be on top of the hard surface of the turret. But assembling it is going to be a bitch. And, to make matters more daunting, the rotation of the foot needs to be correct. See those four balls? Those are where the ankle pistons connect, and they therefore need to line up correctly with the exact front/back/left/right. Eh, you'll see how it turns out. I'm kind of regretting the resin legs right now.


I had an easier time with the third member of the Death Guard kill team:

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This is the Icon Bearer model, and it is superbly designed. It's a wonderful sculpt, in just five pieces, and is a very clever piece of work. There's a huge amount of depth and intricacy in the spaces between objects that really makes it feel dynamic. A far cry from the totally flat poses that we grew up with. It'll probably be awkward to paint, but I think it's great.

As per the previous two models, this is all done including drilled barrel and pinning to the base.

Stelio
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Stelio » Sun Sep 02, 2018 4:17 pm

Yesterday I continued on with the feet, determined to get them completed. (Because I'm now into September, and my game is on the 22nd of this month, and I've got a week in Norway coming up with no modelling.)

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You can see that the underside of the GW plastic feet (on the right) are open and flat, as I mentioned in the previous post. Here's the carving off of the resin foot in progress: the bottom-right has the ridges removed, and the top-right has the whole pad shaved back.

I finished all of that off, and then got to work on the right resin foot which will be on top of the turret. The trick to connecting that was to glue the central foot section to the top of the turret, with the connectors in their slots but not glued. I let that set entirely, making sure that the connectors were still mobile, and then glued the toes on (two at a time, so that I could hold them in place until set).

The end result is superb, and worth the hard work:

Image

You can see how the toes of the right foot are curved round, gripping onto the turret. That's an effect that would be ridiculously difficult to achieve using the plastic foot (in terms of cutting and carving, posing, filling in the tops, and indeed constructing the underneath of the toes).


And then, to fill in the time while waiting for glue to dry on stages of the feet, here's a fourth member of the kill team, this time the combat specialist with the flail of corruption:

Image

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No barrel to drill on this guy. XD

Stelio
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Re: Pandemic

Post by Stelio » Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:50 pm

Having multi-part legs is great for getting exactly the right pose, but it also makes it difficult to assemble and make robust. Here's what I did yesterday...
  • First I set the knee joints: the left leg as straight as possible, the right leg as bent as possible. In practice there's actually not a lot of range in the knee joints: anything beyond vertical going forwards looks inhumanly wrong, and bending back there is a constraint given the large mechanism on the back of the calf. Further, you need to leave enough of a gap to attach the cable that runs from the upper leg to the groin.
  • Then to make the legs strong, I chose to pin the legs at both the ankles and the hips, on both sides. The central part of the foot has a gap down the middle, so I drilled through the base itself to anchor the pins (this means the pin on the right foot is rather long, as it travels all the way through the turret). This is not only good for a strong bond, but also makes it easier to adjust the fit by allowing the pin to drop down through the base temporarily while placing components into the correct positions, before pushing the pin(s) back up again.
  • In order to get the pins in the right places on the ball joints at the ankles and hips, I used a propelling pencil to draw around the housing on the ball joints. I could then much more easily place the drilling holes in the correct positions. See photos...
Image

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Given that careful prep work, I could then complete the superstructure of the legs:

Image

Awesome!

It was only later that I realised that I'd fucked up. While the two legs are almost exactly the same, there is one small difference: at the upper end of the upper legs, where they connect to the ball joints at the hips, one side is meant to go on the outside (rivets around a tighter hole) and one on the inside (no rivets and a wider hole). Looking at the photo above, you'll see the rivets of the right leg on the inside.

:grumble:

Anyhow, I finished the evening by fixing on a few more resin components to the plastic model:

Image

Progress is happening with the knight model. I am pleased.

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